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More Hip Injury Facts:

The hip joint (scientifically known as the acetabulofemoral joint) is a special type of 'ball-and-socket' joint. Its primary function is to support the weight of the body when at rest or while in motion.


Many patients with Hip Pain are actually diagnosed as suffering from Sciatica. Many of our past client have found success in their treatments by incorporating the use of a Hip/Back T•Shellz Wrap in their conservative treatment plan.


The majority of chronic hip problems are a result of aging, disease (such as arthritis) and fractures.


A Hip Replacement is a surgical procedure that replaces the hip joint with an artifical joint. Many MendMyHip customers have sped up their post-surgery recovery time with our therapeutic tools.


Bursitis of the Hip (trochanteric bursitis) is so painful, many sufferers rely on a wheelchar for mobility. Hip Bursitis is a condition that typically responds well to conservative treatments.


The most common injury in the hip is snapping hip syndrome due to a tight illotibial band. This syndrome responds very well to deep heat treatments.


Hip Dislocations are very serious but uncommon injuries that occasionally can occur (usually from a traumatic event). If you suspect you have a dislocated hip, please seek medical attention immediately.

 


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Hip Bursitis (Trochanteric/Iliopsoas Bursitis)


Hip bursitis is a very painful condition in which a bursa sac inside of the hip becomes irritated and inflamed, affecting the bursa and the soft tissue around it. A bursa is a sac of synovial fluid, rich in protein and collagen that acts as a cushion to protect soft tissue, such as tendons, ligaments and muscle, from friction and excess pressure.

Common bursae in the hip joint and hip area.

bursae =
plural form of bursa

We have over 150 bursae in our bodies with most of them located in our joints. Bursae in the hip include the greater trochanteric bursa, deep trochanteric bursa, the iliopsoas bursa, gluteal medius bursa, ischiogluteal bursa, and ischial tuberosity bursa located in the back of the joint. The 3 most common types of hip bursitis occur in the greater trochanter bursa followed by the iliopsoas bursa and ischial bursa (also called the ischial bursa).


Trochanteric Bursitis

The trochanter bursa functions to prevent the iliotibial band (IT band) from rubbing against the greater trochanter of the femoral head. The IT band runs from the iliac crest (crest of the pelvis) down the side of the hip and leg, and inserts at the upper tibia (top of the knee.) It is mainly used along with the gluteus maximus for bracing the leg and knee when in the standing position. Trochanteric bursitis most often results from the iliotibial band (IT Band) tightening and rubbing against the bursa.

The greater trochanter bursa experienced bursitis more commonly than any other hip bursa.

The IT band is made up of thick, fibrous tissue that is considered connective tissue similar to a tendon. When it becomes irritated or inflamed, it can irritate the trochanter bursa causing inflammation within the bursa. Therefore, sufferers of iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) may experience trochanteric bursitis at the same time.

Trochanteric bursitis is often used as a general term to describe pain around the greater trochanteric region of the hip and is often confused with Greater Trochanter Pain Syndrome (GTPS). Trochanteric bursitis is ONE of many component that make up GTPS - the other notables relating to conditions that cause pain in the lateral side of the hip.


Iliopsoas Bursitis

The iliopsoas bursa lies between the front of the hip bone and the iliopsoas muscle, helping reduce friction between this bone and muscle. This bursa usually becomes inflamed due to overuse of the iliopsoas muscle. Overuse can tighten the muscle, causing more pressure on the bursa when the hip is flexed. Iliopsoas bursitis can be mistaken for tendinitis or hip arthritis because of the location of pain and other symptoms.


Ischialgluteal Bursitis

The ischial bursa is located at the bottom of the ischium (lower hip bone). It cushions the gluteus maximus muscle from the ischium when sitting on hard surfaces or when sitting for long periods of time. Ischial bursitis may cause back pain and due to the location, it is often mistaken for sciatica pain.


General Information about Bursitis

Important: In some cases, an inflamed bursa may become infected with bacteria (referred to as septic bursitis) and this can quickly become life threatening! In all cases where you suspect you may have bursitis, see a physician for full diagnosis. If the bursa is septic, getting to a doctor quickly may save your life.

There are two types of bursitis: chronic and acute. Chronic bursitis is caused by overuse or repetition of a certain area or joint. It will develop over time, and will likely get better and flare up over a long period of time. Acute bursitis is often the result of a trauma to the hip, such as a fall. It can also result from a simple movement such as lifting and twisting the wrong way or may come on quickly following irritation during hip surgery.

Some suffers cannot recall what triggered the hip pain, which is why some will not seek treatment, hoping it will resolve itself. However, it is always wise to address and treat hip pain as soon as possible so that the problem does not worsen.


Hip Bursitis Symptoms

A healthy trochanter bursa is usually about the size of a small plum, but can swell to the size of an orange when bursitis sets in. This is what creates the soft tissue damage in the area. Other symptoms you may experience include:

  • Pain around the bursa location that may extend down the groin and thigh
  • Swelling, tenderness in the area of the bursa
  • Pain my increase when the hip is flexed
  • Difficulty sleeping due to pain
  • Limping
  • The area around the bursa is hot to the touch
  • Stiffness and tightness in the hip joint, groin and possibly the knee due to a tight muscle (iliopsoas) or tendon (IT band)

Hip Bursitis Causes

Bursitis of the Hip has been found to be statistically more prevalent in cases where the sufferer is involved in, or experiences one or more of the following factors:

Running can cause chronic bursitis due to overuse of the hip joint.
  • Running, or participation in sports that involve a lot of running
  • Activities which require repeated hip flexion (i.e. ballet, hurdling, soccer)
  • Bone spurs or calcium crystals that form inside can irritate the bursa
  • Repetitive stress on the hip from running, jumping, or squatting
  • An injury or blow to the hip
  • Uneven leg length that causes excess pressure on the bursa
  • Iliotibial band syndrome (ITB)
  • Weak hip abductor muscles (gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and tensor fascia lata)
  • Following surgery in the hip in which the bursa may have been irritated

Treatments for Hip Bursitis

Relieving the symptoms of bursitis initially focuses on keeping the pressure off the bursa. Surgery may be required if your bursa irritation is a result of a bone formation problem, such as a bone spur. If your bursitis is caused by an infection (septic bursitis), the doctor will probably drain the bursa sac with a needle and prescribe antibiotics to treat the infection. For non-infectious bursitis, the preliminary treatment starts with non-operative options such as cold compression therapy via use of a Cold Compress or Ice Pack.

The most important factor in healing bursitis is resting your hip. This can be difficult when you have to carry on with daily activities, but resting whenever you can is recommended. During your recovery you will probably have to modify or avoid the activities that stress your bursa until your pain and inflammation settle.

Treatments should involve decreasing swelling, relieving stress on the hip joint, correcting any bio-mechanical dysfunction (uneven leg length, bone spur, etc.), treating scar tissue, and then finally restoring strength and movement in your leg and hip. Deep Tissue Therapy is recommended once inflammation has been calmed to heal the bursa and surrounding tissue faster and reduce the risk of bursitis returning.

Cold Compress or Ice Pack Cold Therapy

To decrease inflammation and relieve the pain of trochanteric bursitis doctor's recommend cold therapy. Applying cold to your inflamed bursa is the first step in treating bursitis - basically it gets the swelling down.

T•Shellz Wrap Deep Tissue Regeneration Therapy

Once the inflammation of your bursitis has been reduced with cold therapy it is time to take the next step in bursitis treatment. Use a Back/Hip T•Shellz Wrap to improve blood flow while simultaneously helping surrounding soft tissue to become elongated and more elastic. What this means is that not only is increased blood flow helping the bursa and surrounding soft tissue to heal, the tendons/muscles/ligaments that were rubbing on your bursa are now longer and more elastic. The T•Shellz Wraps are basically the perfect bursitis treatment - helping reduce friction and rubbing on the bursa while healing at the same time!


How Do You Use a T•Shellz Wrap (Heat) to Heal a Soft Tissue Injury in Your Hip?


HEAT (warmth) is used after you've reduced your swelling / inflammation and the sharp pain is less intense (you have more of a dull / nagging ache and soft tissue tightness in your hip). Warming up deep tissue using Electromagnetic Energy is a natural way to encourage healing of bursitis and heal surrounding soft tissue. Increasing the temperature of deep tissue results in increased blood flow circulation as the body sends more blood to attempt to remove this same heat. It's the blood in your body that will bring oxygen, nutrients, antibodies and energy to your injured hip to help with healing.

T•Shellz heat blood circulation deep tissue

When heat is applied to deep tissue in the hip, veins will start to get bigger (expand) to allow more blood flow through to your damaged or torn soft tissue. This in turn relaxes your hip, making the tissue more flexible and elastic. This is why heat is used on older (chronic) injuries, to loosen tissue and bring in the blood flow needed for healing. Your body will begin to heal itself after it is injured - increasing your blood flow with heat will speed up this natural process - often surprisingly well.

Doctors usually call this process 'Vasodilation'.


Heat can Make Inflammation, Swelling and Newer Injuries Worse - How?

When we injure ourselves, we start healing right away. The body will naturally raise the temperature at the site of the injury resulting in the inflammatory response (redness, heat sensation, inflammation and swelling). This 'fake fever' leaks blood flow to the area to cool it down and start the healing process.

Adding 'heat' to your hip when it's already inflamed and tender may make your body think there's a new threat to your tissue and increase the pain in order to get you to stop. For some people applying heat on inflamed / swollen tissue will cause the injury to swell-up even more (as much as 3 times larger than normal). You'll feel even more pain as the pressure builds in your hip.

Heat is NOT a good treatment method for inflamed soft tissue, new injuries (within the first 24 to 72 hours), right after surgery or right after a re-injury (over-use and/or sharp, throbbing pain). In these cases, heat should be applied later on in the healing cycle. In the meantime, use a Cold Compress or Ice Pack to decrease any inflammation induced pain.

 

When To Use Heat to Treat Your Injured Hip

A T•Shellz Wrap temperature treatment works best to increase blood flow circulation and stimulate healing for older (chronic) injuries, re-injury (after swelling has been reduced) and during long-term post surgery recovery. Warmer temperatures should be used approximately 3 to 5 days after you first have the injury. Heat should not be started for a least 2 weeks after surgery because inflammation levels will be very high as the healing process starts over again. Any use of heat should also be combined with gradual movement to stretch out your hip and increase range of motion.

right hip treatment TShellz Hip Wrap

If you have a chronic hip injury that keeps getting re-injured you should use heat before activity to loosen up your tissue (making it more flexible). When used at this time the warm temperatures naturally extend the elasticity (elastic-nature) of the joint, making it more movable / pliable for activity.

Sometimes we feel pain while doing a certain activity - should you still use heat? Using heat in the morning before you start your day or before activity can help to boost the healing process and reduce your risk of re-injury. Too much heat (especially when you suffer a set-back with swelling / inflammation) can make your inflammation worse. Cold treatments with a Cold Compress or Ice Pack should be used part-way through your day when you suffer from on-going pain and inflammation as a natural pain-reliever.


Keep using Deep Tissue Regeneration Therapy before activity and when you notice any stiffness in your hip to 'warm up' your muscles, tendons & ligaments - and stimulate healing.

 

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Anti-Inflammatory Medications for Bursitis

NSAIDs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, can be used if required to help manage your pain. However, these aren't recommended for long term use, as they can cause gastrointestinal difficulties and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. The T•Shellz Wrap, when used in conjunction with NSAIDs can greatly improve the effect of the medication; this can not only help you heal quickly but also reduce the amount of NSAIDs that you ultimately may require.


Surgical Procedures for Bursitis

Your doctor may aspirate your inflamed bursa. This involves removing the extra fluid that has built up with a needle. Sometimes, the fluid will be tested at a laboratory to rule out infection.

Many hip conditions are treated with arthroscopic surgery; bursitis, tendinitis, iliopsoas tendon tear, labral tear repair, cartilage trimming, snapping hip syndrome, and trimming bone spurs.

If your bursitis does not get better with conservative treatments, the bursa may be surgically removed. Usually this is done by hip arthroscopy, which is a surgical procedure where tiny incisions are made and a pencil-sized camera is inserted into the hip. A small shaver is inserted into another incision, and is used to remove the swollen bursa all together. The surgeon will then look for any damage to the hip and make repairs if necessary. This is also done to remove any bone spurs.

Recovery time for the surgery will depend on a number of different factors including your healing ability, diet, rest and how many procedures were done in your surgery.

Post-op recovery time can be reduced with the use of Cold Compress or Ice Pack cold compression treatment and Deep Tissue Regeneration Therapy following surgery. Cold compression is recommend by doctors following surgery to treat your pain in a natural, non-addictive way and to reduce swelling. Once the incision has healed, speak with your doctor about the use of Deep Tissue Therapy. Deep Tissue Therapy encourages more oxygen and nutrients to flow to the area to speed healing and improve the strength of the soft tissue in your hip. Using the T•Shellz Wrap as soon as you can following your surgery will help prevent and minimize the scar tissue that forms as you heal. Treating scar tissue is the most important step following surgery, especially in a joint, to improve the range of motion in your hip. Leaving the scar tissue untreated can lead to stiffness, chronic hip pain, osteoarthritis or other chronic conditions.


Rehabilitation Exercise for Bursitis

Physical therapy is a beneficial way to restore atrophied muscles and improve strength and mobility after treating bursitis. The type of physical therapy and the duration will be dependent on the tissue damage and your symptoms. When you are treating or recovering from bursitis, it is important to ensure you do not perform any exercises that will further irritate the bursa.

T•Shellz in conjunction with physical therapy speeds recovery and can help prevent re-injury

Once your pain starts to diminish, a physiotherapist will set up an individualized strengthening and stretching exercise program for you to perform at home or in the gym. This will be based on your needs and abilities, and will help you return to performing your normal routines.

Individuals will often lift weights on their own, to try and build up their strength. However, in doing so, they can do more damage to their joint. It is extremely important to strengthen your muscles properly, as they may have weakened during the period of non-use. A trained therapist will help to ensure your rehabilitation process is appropriate and effective. For best, long term results use T•Shellz Wraps at home, in conjunction with physical therapy and an exercise program.

We've helped thousands of people treat their painful injuries and conditions to get them back on the road to a pain-free life!

Click HERE to Go To Our Online Store We take all major credit cards and Paypal.
If you have questions, call our office at 1-866-237-9608 (toll free continental US).
We offer a 60 day trial period on all our Wraps.


Our customer service lines are open 5 days a week helping people understand their injuries and how to treat them. Simply call toll free 1-866-237-9608 to talk or place an order with one of our knowledgeable Product Advisers. They have the ability to answer questions and even put together a treatment plan for you.

Product specialists are available 9:00 am to 10:00 pm Eastern Standard Time Monday, Tuesday and between 9:00 am and 5:00pm on Wednesday to Friday.

If any question or concern arises, call us or simply send us an email at any time (we check our emails constantly all throughout the day and night.. even on holidays!). We will respond as soon as possible.

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Learn More About Hip Joint Injuries & Treatments

I want to learn more about Hip Surgery & Post-Surgery Recovery

I want to learn more about Deep Tissue Regeneration Therapy

I want to learn more about Ice & Heat: Which Is Better For The Hip?

I want to learn more about Trigger Points in the Hip

I want to learn more about Hip Surgery: Do I Need It?


Please be aware that this information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider before using any of our outstanding products to make sure they're right for you and your condition or if you have any questions regarding a medical condition. It is recommended that you see your doctor for a proper diagnosis as there are many injuries and conditions that could be the cause of your pain.


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There is a lot of information online
- but not all of it is factual. We spend hours per week doing the research... separating fact from fiction. We then present this information in an easy-to-read newsletter, generally sent once per month.


 
 
 
 

Hip Injury Facts:

Over 90% of hip fractures are caused by falling, most frequently on the side of the hip.


Less than 50% of hip fracture patients return to their former level of activity. Proper treatment is important to maintain strength and range of motion.


Hip alignment affects the pressure put on the knees. A hip disorder can aggravate knee pain and vice versa.


1 in 7 Americans, over the age of 60, reports significant hip pain.


In most cases, arthritis pain will not benefit from a hip arthroscopy.


70% of non-fracture hip replacements in 2003-2004 were to treat osteoarthritis.

 

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